Memphis Blog

Can you Drink Alcohol After Botox

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Can you drink alcohol after Botox? Is it safe to drink alcohol after Botox? This is a question that many people have, but can’t seem to find the answer. Our blog post will help you understand what can happen if you do decide to drink alcohol after getting botox injections.

Can you drink alcohol after Botox? Is it safe to drink alcohol after Botox? This is a question that many people have, but can’t seem to find the answer. Our blog post will help you understand what can happen if you do decide to drink alcohol after getting botox injections.

Can I drink alcohol after Botox?

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– Can you drink alcohol after Botox

No. We can’t stress this enough, DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL & GET BOTOX INJECTIONS AT THE SAME TIME! Drinking can increase your chance of getting a serious infection when you get botox injections because it can damage the muscles that are injected with botox and cause them to go into spasm. This not only can lead to issues such as difficulty swallowing and speaking but also increases the spread of bacteria in your body. This can be very dangerous for someone who has recently had their face or neck area injected since these areas contain major blood vessels which will help any infectious bacterias get throughout all parts of your body quickly without anyone noticing right away

This can be bad news for your skin.

Drinking can also increase the risk of developing a condition called “spread to nerve damage” which can lead to an impaired facial expression and in some severe cases, paralysis in certain parts of your face. Although this is rare it does happen so why chance it? If you are absolutely dying for alcohol after botox injections then we recommend waiting at least one month before drinking any kind of alcoholic beverages or even beer since they contain hops that can cause inflammation within the muscles injected with Botox.

Also keep in mind that when getting Botox shots, there is always a small amount left over when injecting into multiple areas on one patient’s body (like around both eyes or between eyebrows). This can spread further than you think, which can lead to unwanted side effects.

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